Forn Sed

Often known under the name Asatru.

This blog will focus on historical accuracy and reconstructionism but also on the contemporary religion and sometimes wander into other heathenry, like Anglo - Saxon faith, Odinism, Theodism and so on.
There will however never be any bigotry, homophobia, anti Semitism or stupid ideas of a "pure" Germanic race. hello! theme by cissysaurus
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Scandinavia
Burial mounds were in use until the 11th century in Scandinavia and figure heavily into Norse paganism. In their undamaged state they appear as small, man-made hillocks, though many examples have been damaged by ploughing or deliberately damaged so that little visible evidence remains.
By burning the deceased, it was believed that the person was transferred to Valhalla by the consuming force of the fire. The fire could reach temperatures of 1500 °C. The remains were covered with cobblestones and then a layer of gravel and sand and finally a thin layer of turf. As the old Scandinavians worshiped their ancestors, the mounds were also places of worship. In Norse mythology, the draugr was an undead creature that haunted burial mounds.
[ Thus he (Odin) established by law that all dead men should be burned, and their belongings laid with them on the pile, and the ashes be cast into the sea or buried in the earth. Thus, said he, every one will come to Valhalla with the riches he had with him upon the pile, and he would also enjoy whatever he himself buried in the earth. For men of consequence a mound should be raised to their memory, and for all other warriors distinguished for manhood, a standing stone. This custom remained long after Odin’s time. […] It was their faith that the higher the smoke arose in the air, the higher he would be raised whose pile it was, and the richer he would be, the more property that was consumed with him ] - Ynglinga Saga


[edit]Sweden
King Björn’s barrow in Håga,Sweden.
Anundshög, located just outside the City of Västerås, is Sweden’s largest burial mound.
Gravhög Gårdstånga, situated in Eslöv Municipality, Skåne County, is the site of a Bronze Age burial mound, (Swedish: Gravhög).
Hågahögen, King Björn’s barrow in Håga (Old Norse word: haugr) near Uppsala has a very strong connection with Björn at Haugi.
Kungshögar, an archaeological site on the Lake Mälaren island of Adelsö in Ekerö Municipality, contains five large burial mounds .
Skalunda hög in Västergötland, the site of Skalunda Barrow, an historic burial mound.
[edit]Norway
Borrehaugene (Borre mound cemetery) forms part of the Borre National Park in Horten, Vestfold. The park covers 45 acres (180,000 m2) and its collection of burial mounds includes, seven large mounds and one 25 small cairns.
Gokstadhaugen a burial mound in Sandefjord, Vestfold, revealed a ship burial containing the Gokstad ship, a Viking era ship dated back to 9th century. The ship is the largest in the Viking Ship Museum in Bygdøy, Oslo.
Båthaugen, a boat burial mound found at Rolvsøy in Tune, Østfold, contained the Tune ship, a Viking era ship of the “karv” type The ship was built around AD 900 and is made of clinkered oak planks.
Oseberghaugen, the Oseberg burial mound at Oseberg near Tønsberg in Vestfold county, contained the Oseberg ship, a well-preserved Viking era ship dating from around AD 800.
Storhaug (Great Mound) ship’s burial mound Avaldsnes on Karmøy in Rogaland County, Norway contained a ship made of oak.
Grønhaug (Green Mound), a ship burial at Avaldsnes, contained an approximately 15-metre (49 ft) long boat with remains of a man’s grave from the 10th century.
Flagghaugen (Flag Hill Mound) at Avaldsnes, one of Norway’s richest grave dating from the pre-Viking Period, contained a neck ring of 600 grams (19 ozt) of pure gold, weapons, bandoleer mountings and various tubs of silver and bronze.
Raknehaugen, estimated to date to around 550 AD, is located in the traditional district of Romerike
Karnilshaugen, in Gloppen in the county of Sogn og Fjordane, is the site of Karnils tumulus burial mound
[edit]Denmark
The tumulus Tinghøjen[8] located between Randers and Viborg, one of about 26,000[9] conserved tumuli in Denmark. Photo from January, 2010.
Yding Skovhøj in Horsens municipality, Jutland is one of Denmark’s Bronze Age burial mounds built on the top of the hill.
Klekkende Høj is a megalithic tomb on the island of Møn. It takes its name near the village of Klekkende.
Lindholm Høje is a major Viking burial site and former settlement situated to the north of and overlooking the city of Aalborg.
Grønjægers Høj, meaning the mound of Green Hunter, is located near Fanefjord Church on the Danish island of Møn.

Scandinavia

Burial mounds were in use until the 11th century in Scandinavia and figure heavily into Norse paganism. In their undamaged state they appear as small, man-made hillocks, though many examples have been damaged by ploughing or deliberately damaged so that little visible evidence remains.

By burning the deceased, it was believed that the person was transferred to Valhalla by the consuming force of the fire. The fire could reach temperatures of 1500 °C. The remains were covered with cobblestones and then a layer of gravel and sand and finally a thin layer of turf. As the old Scandinavians worshiped their ancestors, the mounds were also places of worship. In Norse mythology, the draugr was an undead creature that haunted burial mounds.

Thus he (Odin) established by law that all dead men should be burned, and their belongings laid with them on the pile, and the ashes be cast into the sea or buried in the earth. Thus, said he, every one will come to Valhalla with the riches he had with him upon the pile, and he would also enjoy whatever he himself buried in the earth. For men of consequence a mound should be raised to their memory, and for all other warriors distinguished for manhood, a standing stone. This custom remained long after Odin’s time. […] It was their faith that the higher the smoke arose in the air, the higher he would be raised whose pile it was, and the richer he would be, the more property that was consumed with him ] - Ynglinga Saga


[edit]Sweden

King Björn’s barrow in Håga,Sweden.

[edit]Norway

  • Borrehaugene (Borre mound cemetery) forms part of the Borre National Park in HortenVestfold. The park covers 45 acres (180,000 m2) and its collection of burial mounds includes, seven large mounds and one 25 small cairns.
  • Gokstadhaugen a burial mound in SandefjordVestfold, revealed a ship burial containing the Gokstad ship, a Viking era ship dated back to 9th century. The ship is the largest in the Viking Ship Museum in BygdøyOslo.
  • Båthaugen, a boat burial mound found at Rolvsøy in TuneØstfold, contained the Tune ship, a Viking era ship of the “karv” type The ship was built around AD 900 and is made of clinkered oak planks.
  • Oseberghaugen, the Oseberg burial mound at Oseberg near Tønsberg in Vestfold county, contained the Oseberg ship, a well-preserved Viking era ship dating from around AD 800.
  • Storhaug (Great Mound) ship’s burial mound Avaldsnes on Karmøy in Rogaland County, Norway contained a ship made of oak.
  • Grønhaug (Green Mound), a ship burial at Avaldsnes, contained an approximately 15-metre (49 ft) long boat with remains of a man’s grave from the 10th century.
  • Flagghaugen (Flag Hill Mound) at Avaldsnes, one of Norway’s richest grave dating from the pre-Viking Period, contained a neck ring of 600 grams (19 ozt) of pure gold, weapons, bandoleer mountings and various tubs of silver and bronze.
  • Raknehaugen, estimated to date to around 550 AD, is located in the traditional district of Romerike
  • Karnilshaugen, in Gloppen in the county of Sogn og Fjordane, is the site of Karnils tumulus burial mound

[edit]Denmark

The tumulus Tinghøjen[8] located between Randers and Viborg, one of about 26,000[9] conserved tumuli in Denmark. Photo from January, 2010.

  1. fornsed posted this