Forn Sed

Often known under the name Asatru.

This blog will focus on historical accuracy and reconstructionism but also on the contemporary religion and sometimes wander into other heathenry, like Anglo - Saxon faith, Odinism, Theodism and so on.
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02
19

The Norns (Old Norse: norn, plural: nornir) in Norse mythology are female beings who rule the destiny of gods and men, a kind of dísir comparable to the Fates in classical mythology.
According to Snorri Sturluson's interpretation of the Völuspá, the three most important norns, Urðr (Wyrd), Verðandi and Skuld come out from a hall standing at the Well of Urðr (well of fate) and they draw water from the well and take sand that lies around it, which they pour overYggdrasill so that its branches will not rot.

 These norns are described as three powerful maiden giantesses (Jotuns) whose arrival fromJötunheimr ended the golden age of the gods. They may be the same as the maidens of Mögþrasir who are described in Vafþrúðnismál .

Beside these three norns, there are many other norns who arrive when a person is born in order to determine his or her future. There were both malevolent and benevolent norns, and the former caused all the malevolent and tragic events in the world while the latter were kind and protective goddesses. Recent research has discussed the relation between the myths associated with norns and valkyries and the actual travelling Völvas (seiðr-workers), women who visited newborn children in the pre-Christian Norse societies.


Whereas the origin of the name norn is uncertain, it may derive from a word meaning “to twine” and which would refer to their twining the thread of fate.
The name Urðr (Wyrd, Weird) means “fate”. Both Urðr and Verðandi are derived from the Old Norse verb verða, “to become”. While Urðrderives from the past tense (“that which became or happened”), Verðandi derives from the present tense of verða (“that which is happening”).Skuld is derived from the Old Norse verb skole/skulle, “need/ought to be/shall be”; its meaning is “that which should become, or that needs to occur”.

The Norns (Old Norsenorn, plural: nornir) in Norse mythology are female beings who rule the destiny of gods and men, a kind of dísir comparable to the Fates in classical mythology.

According to Snorri Sturluson's interpretation of the Völuspá, the three most important norns, Urðr (Wyrd), Verðandi and Skuld come out from a hall standing at the Well of Urðr (well of fate) and they draw water from the well and take sand that lies around it, which they pour overYggdrasill so that its branches will not rot.

 These norns are described as three powerful maiden giantesses (Jotuns) whose arrival fromJötunheimr ended the golden age of the gods. They may be the same as the maidens of Mögþrasir who are described in Vafþrúðnismál .

Beside these three norns, there are many other norns who arrive when a person is born in order to determine his or her future. There were both malevolent and benevolent norns, and the former caused all the malevolent and tragic events in the world while the latter were kind and protective goddesses. Recent research has discussed the relation between the myths associated with norns and valkyries and the actual travelling Völvas (seiðr-workers), women who visited newborn children in the pre-Christian Norse societies.

Völva Kari

Whereas the origin of the name norn is uncertain, it may derive from a word meaning “to twine” and which would refer to their twining the thread of fate.

The name Urðr (Wyrd, Weird) means “fate”. Both Urðr and Verðandi are derived from the Old Norse verb verða, “to become”. While Urðrderives from the past tense (“that which became or happened”), Verðandi derives from the present tense of verða (“that which is happening”).Skuld is derived from the Old Norse verb skole/skulle, “need/ought to be/shall be”; its meaning is “that which should become, or that needs to occur”.