Forn Sed

Often known under the name Asatru.

This blog will focus on historical accuracy and reconstructionism but also on the contemporary religion and sometimes wander into other heathenry, like Anglo - Saxon faith, Odinism, Theodism and so on.
There will however never be any bigotry, homophobia, anti Semitism or stupid ideas of a "pure" Germanic race. hello! theme by cissysaurus
03
13
Picture: Garenin Black House Village-Isle Of Lewis
http://www.classic-sailing.co.uk/destinations/st-kilda-outer-hebrides-orkney

The Kingdom of the Isles comprised the Hebrides, the islands of the Firth of Clyde and the Isle of Man from the 9th to the 13th centuries AD. The islands were known to the Norse as the Suðreyjar, or “Southern Isles” as distinct from the Norðreyjar or Northern Isles of Orkney and Shetland. The historical record is incomplete, and the kingdom was not a continuous entity throughout the entire period. The islands concerned are sometimes referred to as the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles, although only some of the later rulers claimed that title. At times the rulers were independent of external control, although for much of the period they had overlords in Norway, Ireland, England, Scotland or Orkney. At times there also appear to have been competing claims for all or parts of the territory. The islands involved have a total land area of over 8,300 square kilometres (3,205 sq mi) and extend for more than 500 kilometres (310 mi) from north to south.
Viking influence in the area commenced in the late 8th century, and whilst there is no doubt that the Uí Ímair dynasty played a prominent role in this early period, the records for the dates and details of the rulers are speculative until the mid-10th century. Hostility between the Kings of the Isles and the rulers of Ireland, and intervention by the crown of Norway (either directly or through their vassal the Earl of Orkney) were recurring themes.


Location of the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles at the end of the 11th century
 
 
Invasion by Magnus Barelegs in the late 11th century resulted in a brief period of direct Norwegian rule over the kingdom, but soon the descendants of Godred Crovan re-asserted a further period of largely independent overlordship. This came to an end with the emergence of Somerled, on whose death in 1164 the kingdom was split in two. Just over a century later the islands became part of the Kingdom of Scotland, following the 1266 Treaty of Perth.

Picture: Garenin Black House Village-Isle Of Lewis

http://www.classic-sailing.co.uk/destinations/st-kilda-outer-hebrides-orkney

The Kingdom of the Isles comprised the Hebrides, the islands of the Firth of Clyde and the Isle of Man from the 9th to the 13th centuries AD. The islands were known to the Norse as the Suðreyjar, or “Southern Isles” as distinct from the Norðreyjar or Northern Isles of Orkney and Shetland. The historical record is incomplete, and the kingdom was not a continuous entity throughout the entire period. The islands concerned are sometimes referred to as the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles, although only some of the later rulers claimed that title. At times the rulers were independent of external control, although for much of the period they had overlords in Norway, Ireland, England, Scotland or Orkney. At times there also appear to have been competing claims for all or parts of the territory. The islands involved have a total land area of over 8,300 square kilometres (3,205 sq mi) and extend for more than 500 kilometres (310 mi) from north to south.

Viking influence in the area commenced in the late 8th century, and whilst there is no doubt that the Uí Ímair dynasty played a prominent role in this early period, the records for the dates and details of the rulers are speculative until the mid-10th century. Hostility between the Kings of the Isles and the rulers of Ireland, and intervention by the crown of Norway (either directly or through their vassal the Earl of Orkney) were recurring themes.

File:Kingdom of Mann and the Isles-en.svg

Location of the Kingdom of Mann and the Isles at the end of the 11th century
 
 

Invasion by Magnus Barelegs in the late 11th century resulted in a brief period of direct Norwegian rule over the kingdom, but soon the descendants of Godred Crovan re-asserted a further period of largely independent overlordship. This came to an end with the emergence of Somerled, on whose death in 1164 the kingdom was split in two. Just over a century later the islands became part of the Kingdom of Scotland, following the 1266 Treaty of Perth.

  1. violette-royale reblogged this from fornsed
  2. baltazarcorwin reblogged this from littlewanderingthing
  3. ivoryeyes reblogged this from receptacle
  4. bluelittlegirl reblogged this from fornsed
  5. daruncic reblogged this from elethiel
  6. nordenfjells reblogged this from fornsed
  7. themodernsouthernpagan reblogged this from wyrtwita
  8. polarbear1986 reblogged this from wyrtwita
  9. receptacle reblogged this from fornsed
  10. elethiel reblogged this from dbmurphy
  11. dbmurphy reblogged this from ketze
  12. ketze reblogged this from fornsed
  13. disarrayofhappenstance reblogged this from fornsed
  14. handsome--gretel reblogged this from fornsed
  15. v0odoo-barbie reblogged this from wyrtwita
  16. whippoorwillbooks reblogged this from fornsed
  17. daughterofavalon reblogged this from arianemoon
  18. neverlands-lost-children reblogged this from arianemoon
  19. arianemoon reblogged this from wyrtwita
  20. forestfaerie reblogged this from wyrtwita
  21. hodors-stuntdouble reblogged this from fornsed
  22. littlewanderingthing reblogged this from wyrtwita
  23. wyrtwita reblogged this from fornsed
  24. demoncrys-angelsfall reblogged this from goddess29
  25. akedian reblogged this from fornsed
  26. twistytree reblogged this from fornsed